Hi folks.

Thank you for visiting this wine aerator review. All of information is based on my personal observations and I have been as truthful as I can and have backed up my views and thoughts with quite a few photos. I hope that you find some of the information useful to you.

All I am doing today is testing out three popular wine bottle aerators. These are the attached type, the type that fits into the neck of the bottle. There are numerous unattached types that you have to hold above the glass but I wanted to test out this type because I wanted to find one that leaves one hand free while I am pouring out the wine.

For definition purposes, I will call them curved, rotating and straight versions as shown in the following photos.

wine aerators

I have broken the review down into different sections to make it easier to understand. (Hopefully)

Features
Construction
Ease of Use / Cleaning
Bubble Factor
Aesthetics
Extras
Cost
Summary


Features

Each aerator has different features. Obviously they all need a wine intake and outlet and an air intake system, it ‘s just the way they are put into service that is different.

Curved Aerator

The curved aerator has some great features. Starting with the air intake system which is a really clever system. As the wine from the bottle flows through the primary wine intake and the center of the aerator, it pulls air in through the air intake system and it gets infused into the flowing wine. There is a secondary wine intake that joins with the air intake system and makes the oxygenation more efficient.

Air Intake System
Air Intake System

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There is a splash guard around the air intake system. This is just to ensure that any of the wine from the secondary wine flow doesn’t splash out as it mixes with the air. This splash guard can easily be twisted off for cleaning purposes but I don’t even bother to remove it because the wine rinses out very easily anyhow.

The silicone connection simply fits into the neck of the bottle. Obviously it is tapered slightly so that it will fit into most bottles. I think that once it is fitted into the bottle, it shouldn’t be moved around because any wine on the silicone connector might make it slippery against the glass. A minor observation.
V Notch
Aerator StandThe anti-drip shield that surrounds the silicone connector is there just to ensure that should any wine escape through it, won’t drip out.

The curved aerator spout has a “V” shaped notch in the lip of the exit of the spout which keeps drips down to a minimum plus it allows for precision pouring. I think it works because it breaks up or disrupts the “water” tension of the wine as it pours and it doesn’t shoot off in all directions. Simple yet effective.

A base is included with the curved model. The aerator snaps into position and pulls out with a slight tug. I really think the bases are a good idea. Apart from the aesthetics, they are really useful for keeping the aerator safe.

Rotating Aerator

The rotating aerator has a very obvious feature…. the rotating wheel. You can see the wine as it passes through the aerator and it spins the paddled wheel. There are a couple of tiny air holes in the top of the wheel section which as the wine flows through, draws in the air to mix with the wine spinning in the wheel. The oxygenation system is the wheel and the tiny holes and doesn’t have a complicated dual wine intake. It does have two wine intakes but the join up again inside the aerator and don’t help with aeration. There may as well be only one wine intake hole.

Rotating Wheel Aerators
Rotating Wheel Aerators

As with the curved model, there is a tapered silicone connector. It fits easily into the bottles neck. The taper is more pronounced and will probably fit a wider bottle neck. There is no anti drip shield with this type.

The pouring spout is a simple cylinder cut at an angle and is pretty basic. The wine exits quite fast and isn’t as precise as the other two aerators. It does a job though.

Straight Aerator

The straight model has a lovely looking pouring spout as I said. It doesn’t have a v notch but the shape of the spout allows the wine to flow out smoothly but not as thin a flow as the curved version. Still good though.

The aeration system is closer in design to the curved model than the rotating model. It has a primary and secondary wine intake. The primary wine intake flow draws in the air through the air intake hole. The secondary wine flow seems to mix with the air in the chamber and go down into the main wine flow.

The silicone connector resembles the one from the rotating model. It is slightly thicker at the top and will fit a slightly wider bottle neck.

There is no base with this one, which is a shame really. It does fit into the base of the rotating model but that’s not much help.


Construction

Acrylic is very durable, in other words resistant to heat, cold, sunlight and is strong and shatterproof. Some dish washer chemicals can affect its integrity.

Silicone is also highly durable, can withstand very high temperatures and can withstand most chemicals and is resistant to mold and bacteria.

Curved and Straight Aerators

Both of these styles are made from food grade acrylic and silicone. The main body being of extruded acrylic so is in one piece, and the tapered connector being silicone. There are no moving parts with these two aerators and should last a long time.

Rotating Aerator

This one is made from food grade acrylic for the rotating wheel, stainless steel for the outside of the spout and body support, silicone tapered connector, another plastic for the main body and another plastic for the wine intake system. Being a moving part, the rotating wheel is the thing that will probably fail first. The main body is formed from two halves and may fail and leak eventually.


Ease of Use / Cleaning

There is nothing to choose between all three models. Simply insert them into the neck of the bottle and pour. Gravity takes care of the rest. As I said, these attached types leave your hand free. This is a benefit because with the free hand you can hold the glass or decanter and move it around to achieve a greater degree of control of where the wine goes.

Cleaning up after using them is a breeze. Once you have finished using them, simply run under the fresh water tap for a few moments and they will soon rinse out, then leave them dry out. It is recommended to hand rinse them rather than put them in the dishwasher because acrylic can start to develop fine lines or hairline cracks due to dishwasher chemicals.

The two types that are supplied with the base are better. Once the aerators are rinsed out, they will dry out in the base. Also the base keeps them from being damaged in the kitchen drawer.

Floating Bubbles


Bubble Factor

I didn’t know what else to call this section. It’s not about how effective wine aerators are, or if you believe breathing wine makes a difference at all. It’s about the quality of the bubbles themselves. I enjoyed testing them out. For the test, I used a bottle filled with tap water. Obviously it is nearly the same as pouring out wine from the bottle, except tap water is a lot less expensive than wine when doing experiments, and I did go through about ten bottles of water to get the desired results.

Curved Aerator

The bubbles that came out from the curved aerator were quite large really. There was an even amount of bubbles all the way through as the bottle emptied apart from the very start of the pour. This was due to the fact that there was only a small amount of air in the bottle to start. By tipping the bottle at a steeper angle, the wine flowed and the air infused superbly. There was a very satisfying gurgling sound as the aerated wine left the spout. This was a very good even aeration through the entire bottle.

 

Rotating Aerator

Well, I was disappointed to be fair. The wine went through the aerator really well. The thing was, the rotating wheel didn’t rotate all the time. It did when I tipped the bottle up steeply and the rotating wheel looked awesome. The problem was that even when the wheel did spin, it didn’t seem to aerate the wine very well, if at all. This produced very little aeration.

 

Straight Aerator

I really enjoyed the pour with this one. There was a very even bubble count of small bubbles. The air intake hole is smaller than the curved aerator’s air intake hole, therefore the smaller bubbles. It poured from the very start all the way to the end of the bottle. This was a very close second “bubble factor” to the curved model.

 

 

I chose the bubble factor of the curved model because I believe that there was a greater surface area of the water “wine” coming into contact with the air than the other two aerators.

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Aesthetics

The first thing I am looking at is the way they look, their visual appeal. I know that it’s how they work that is paramount, but I like to look at the whole picture, how they would look on the worktop, a kitchen cabinet, or wherever they are to be kept. Will they complement the kitchen design and other tools and utensils?

Curved Aerator
Curved Aerator in Stand
Curved Aerator in Stand

The pouring spout of the curved version seems to head off at an unusual angle and looks like a beak of a bird of prey. Some of these types are called Hawk aerators. Apparently, the angle ensures the wine gets maximum aeration as it passes through the device and it comes out at a natural angle meaning greater control of the wine direction. I think it looks slightly wobbly or top heavy, (it’s not), but it’s ok and it takes a bit of getting used to but it has grown on me.

It also comes with a base which holds it aloft in full view. I like the sharp cut grooves in the top and the bottom of the spout because when bright light catches it or if it is in a sunny position inside the base, it glistens like a crystal prism.

Rotating Aerator in Stand
Rotating Aerator in Stand
Rotating Aerator

Obviously, the rotating aerator looks pretty snazzy. Even when stationary, the rotating wheel is pretty eye catching, and was what attracted me to this model in the first place. When wine is being poured and it is spinning, it is great to watch it go whirling round. Gimmick or not?

The whole design reminds me of a paddle steamer. The rotating wheel being the paddles, and the spout looks like the funnel. Once again, the aerator is placed in a base to keep it from being damaged and its lines look slightly more pleasing than the curved type. There is a silver colored rim around the bottom of the base.

Straight Aerator

Well, the straight aerator is basically… straight. There is nothing spectacular about it. It looks sharp and sleek. The pouring spout looks really pleasing to the eye, curving slightly downwards and expanding at the exit. Very nice. It didn’t come with a base so it can’t be held aloft and on show like the previous two models are.

Straight Aerator
Straight Aerator


Extras

There are many similar models to the ones that I purchased and am doing this review for. Some companies and brands may offer extras with their particular brand.

Curved Aerator
Foil Cutter
Foil Cutter
Vacuum Bottle Stopper
Vacuum Bottle Stopper

This one comes with a base as standard and also came with a foil cutter to remove the foil from around the bottle top and the cork. It also came with a vacuum bottle stopper to keep the wine fresher if you don’t finish it and want to keep it for a while.

Rotating Aerator

This model came with a base as standard.

Straight Aerator

This one came just as it is with no extras.


Cost

Once again, different brands with similar models offer different prices and those prices move also. It is about what you can get at the time. Anyhow, this is what I paid for mine.

Curved Aerator    $ 14.59
Rotating Aerator $ 18.95
Straight Aerator   $ 13.63


Summary

Curved Aerator Rotating Aerator Straight Aerator
Features
Construction
Ease of Use / Cleaning
Bubble Factor
Aesthetics
Extras
Value
Overall

After taking everything into consideration with this review of these three aerators, I feel that the curved model comes out on top. This is due to the fact that although it works on a par with the straight model, it comes with added bonuses which on their own add up to another $20 or so. It may cost another $2 more that the straight aerator but these add ons are very useful and not just for show.

The straight model cones a close second but as I said, the add ons just leave it short.

Although the rotating model looks great, it fails to impress when aerating the wine, plus it costs more than the other two.

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Wine Aerator Review – In Bottle Pourer Breathers
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